Arne Jacobsen, Kube Flex Summerhouse.

Arne Jacobsen, Kube Flex Summerhouse.

A Summer Home and Practice of the Man Who Gave Us Danish Modern

Arne Jacobsen, Kubeflex Summerhouse.

Arne Jacobsen, Bellavista housing, 419-451 Klampenborg, Copenhagen, 1934.

 

Trapholt
Æblehaven 23
+45 76 30 05 30
Kolding
Denmark
Arne Jacobsen's Summerhouse
Permanent exhibition

Arne Jacobsen’s prototype summerhouse Kubeflex, the only of its kind, has been re-established at Trapholt and furnished with Arne Jacobsen design. Our guests can expect a unique experience of the internationally known architect.

In 1969-70 Arne Jacobsen developed the house in cooperation with Høm Typehuse, and it was introduced for the first time at the standard house fair Archibo in 1970.

With the cubic modules of 10 square meters as the starting point Kubeflex was thought to be a flexible system where units could be combined and more units added if needed.

A house that could be changed according to the owner’s needs. However, neither the time nor the market was ready for such a radical and architectural experiment and Kubeflex was never put into production.

For many years the Kubeflex house was placed at Sjaelland where it functioned as the Jacobsen’s summerhouse. Only the most enthusiastic architekcts have known its existence, and over the years some technically interested people have contacted the family in order to see this radical example of a modern residence.

Among the interior there are examples of Arne Jacobsen’s design, e.g. the fitting series Vola and the coffee set Cylinda Line.

With Kubeflex Trapholt has acquired a unique attraction, that beautifully supports the extensive collection of furniture by Danish architects and designers.

Jacobsen (February 11, 1902 – March 24, 1971) was a Danish Jewish architect and designer, exemplar of the "Danish Modern" style.

Among his architectural achievements are St Catherine's College, Oxford, work at Merton College, Oxford, the Radisson SAS Royal Hotel, Copenhagen, the Danish National Bank building in Copenhagen, The Royal Danish Embassy in Knightsbridge, London as well as a number of town halls and other buildings in his native Denmark. Jacobsen has created a number of highly original chairs and other furniture. He has received several international distinctions and medals.

Many of Jacobsen's furniture designs have become classic, including the Ant chair from 1952 and the Swan and the Egg which were both designed for the Radisson SAS Hotel. Jacobsen is, however, perhaps best known for the Model 3107 chair of 1955, known also as the "Number 7 Chair" which has sold over 5 million copies. The Number 7 chair is perhaps best known for being the prop used to hide Christine Keeler's nakedness in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait of 1963. Morley just happened to use a chair that he had in the studio, which turns out to have been a copy of Jacobsen's design. Since then, Number 7 chairs have been used for many similar portraits imitating the pose.

His other visible contribution to pop culture in the media is his flatware design, with right- and left-handed spoons in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, picked for the film because of its "futuristic" design.

St Catherine's College, Oxford, his interpretation of a quadrangle-based college, has all the requisite elements: a quad centered on a lawn (a circle with one or two Cedar of Lebanon trees), student rooms (laid out in two long rows), a garden, a dining hall and SCR, Master's Lodgings, and a "feature" (in this case, a lily pond). His creativity did not end there, however. A fastidious perfectionist, he also designed the original flatware, all of the furniture in the rooms, the locks and keys, the door handles, the sinks, the taps, and all the lights. Though only staircases 1 and 2 have the original and completed design (and his entire design originally was more extensive, with a three-story layout), the metal shower stalls and bathrooms are intact. It is also notable that the original paving is almost perfectly parallel and perpendicular to the buildings despite 30 years of wear.

Arne Jacobsen, Swan and Egg chairs.

Arne Jacobsen, SAS Royal Hotel Furniture.

Arne Jacobsen, Panoramic view of SAS Royal Hotel. Copenhagen.