Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Chapelle Notre-Dame du Haut, Ronchamp. 1950-55. East facade, southwest facade corner and transverse north-south section with campanile. 1950. Pencil, colored pencil, and pastel on vellum, 23 x 21 3/4″ (58.4 x 55.2 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). View of the Frauenkirche, Munich. 1911. Watercolor, pencil, and ink on paper, 17 5/16 x 14″ (44 x 35.5 cm). Institut für Geschichte und Theorie der Architektur (gta), ETH Zürich.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Model of the Palace of the Soviets, Moscow. 1931-1932. Wood, paint, metal, plastic, and glass, 14 x 33 1/2 x 67” (35.6 x 85.1 x 170.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Special Purchase Fund, 1941. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier, the Many Disciplines in a Sophisticated Landscape Practice

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Villa Le Lac, Corseaux. 1923–24. Interior perspective with view of Lake Geneva. Ink and colored pencil on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 5/8″ (21 x 27 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Nature morte. 1920. Oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 39 1/4″ (80.9 x 99.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Van Gogh Purchase Fund. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Blue mountains. 1910. Pencil, watercolor, ink on paper, 6 3/8 x 7 11/16″ (16.2 x 19.5 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Competition project for the League of Nations, Geneva, 1927. Axonometric. Heliographic print on paper, with ink and collage, 53 3/8 x 57 7/8″ (135.5 x 147 cm). Institut für Geschichte und Theorie der Architektur, ETH Zürich.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). The Parthenon, Athens. 1911. Tangential view. Pencil, gouache, and watercolor on paper, 8 1/4 x 5 3/8″ (21 x 13.7 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

 

Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
212-708-9431
New York
The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor
Le Corbusier:
An Atlas of Modern Landscapes

June 15-September 23, 2013

For the first time in its history, Museum of Modern Art presents a comprehensive exhibition on the work of Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, French, born Switzerland, 1887-1965), encompassing his work as architect, interior designer, artist, city planner, writer, and photographer.

Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes, reveals ways in which Le Corbusier observed and imagined landscapes throughout his career, using the artistic mediums and techniques at his disposal, from early watercolors of Italy, Greece, and Turkey, to sketches of India, and from photographs of his formative journeys to architectural models of his large-scale projects. All these dimensions of his artistic process, including major paintings and five reconstructed interiors, are presented in the largest exhibition ever produced in New York of Le Corbusier’s protean and influential oeuvre.

Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes draws on MoMA’s own collection, and substantially on exclusive loans from the Paris-based Le Corbusier Foundation. MoMA is the only U.S. venue for the exhibition, which will travel to Fundació "la Caixa" in Madrid (April 1-June 29, 2014), and to Fundació "la Caixa" in Barcelona (July 15-October 19, 2014). The exhibition is organized by guest curator Jean-Louis Cohen, Sheldon H. Solow Professor in the History of Architecture, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, with Barry Bergdoll, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at MoMA.

Le Corbusier constantly observed and imagined landscapes. These are deployed panoramically in the exhibition not only through his paintings and drawings of sites and cities, but also through original models, photographs, sound recordings, and even recently discovered silent films shot by Le Corbusier himself in the 1930s.

Following a path from his youth in the Swiss Jura mountains to his death on the shores of the French Riviera, the exhibition focuses on four types of landscapes, observed or conceived at different scales, and documented in all the genres he practiced during six decades: the landscape of found objects; the domestic landscape; the architectural landscape of the modern city; and the vast territories he planned.

From the “typical objects” featured in his Purist still lifes to the “objects of poetic reaction” that inspired his paintings from the 1930s through the 1950s, the landscape of found objects is mainly documented with major paintings by Le Corbusier. Beginning with the interiors he designed for the watch-making industry of his native La Chaux-de-Fonds, in Switzerland, five reconstructed interiors, featuring original furniture, vividly present his concepts for domestic landscapes, and the notion of houses operating as machines to view landscapes.

The dialectic between the picturesque perception of city form and the grand patterns that determined many of his large building projects is revealed as the generator of his architectural landscapes. Finally, projects such as the plans for Rio de Janeiro or Algiers, born out of the interpretation of urban geography, and the designs for the new Indian city of Chandigarh reveal how extended territories were interpreted as open landscapes.

Twenty-five years after Le Corbusier, une encyclopédie, published in Paris on the occasion of the centennial of his birth, a major multi-author sourcebook mapping Le Corbusier’s projects, plans, and worldwide travel will be published, under the same title as the exhibition, by Museum of Modern Art.

Building on the notion of the centrality of concepts of landscape and territory in the work of Le Corbusier, the publication brings together an array of authoritative but fresh viewpoints, and promises to provide a reference tool for years to come.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Istanbul silhouettes. n.d. Watercolor on paper, 15 15/16 x 12 1/2″ (40.5 x 31.8 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Project for the Governor’s Palace, Chandigarh. 1951-65. Garden study. Pencil, color pencil and ink on paper. 27 x 21 cm. Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC .

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Evocation of sunset. n.d. Oil on paper, 12 1/8 x 8 3/16″ (30.8 x 20.8 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Urban Plan for Algiers, project Plan and perspective. 1935. Pastel on paper. 39 3/4 x 109 1/2″ (101 x 278.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Robert A. Jacobs. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Unité d’habitation, Marseille. 1945-52. View of the model of the roof terrace, mounted on the background of the Provence landscape. n.d. Black and white print on paper, 3 15/16 x 7 1/16″ (10 x 18 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965) with Pierre Jeanneret (Swiss, 1896-1967). Model of the Villa Savoye, Poissy. 1928–31. Wood, aluminum, and plastic, 16 x 34 x 32″ (40.6 x 86.4 x 81.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC.

Le Corbusier, Phillips Pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels, 1958, © FLC, Paris and DACS, London 2009.

Le Corbusier, the 20th Century Reinventor of Modern Living

Le Corbusier, Notre Dame du Haut chapel, Ronchamp, 1955, Photo credit: Bildarchiv Monheim/arcaid.co.uk, © FLC, Paris and DACS, London 2009.

Le Corbusier, Unité d’habitation de Marseille, roof view, 1946-52, © FLC, Paris and DACS, London 2009.

Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Fauteuil à dossier basculant, 1928, © FLC/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2009.

 

Barbican Centre
Silk Street
+ 020 7638 4141
London
Le Corbusier – The Art of Architecture
February 19-May 24, 2009

Le Corbusier (1887-1965), widely acclaimed as the most influential architect of the 20th century, was also a celebrated thinker, writer and artist — a multi-faceted "renaissance man." His architecture and radical ideas for reinventing modern living, from private villas to large scale social housing to utopian urban plans, still resonate today.

Le Corbusier - The Art of Architecture is the first major survey in London of the internationally renowned architect in more than 20 years. This timely reassessment presents a wealth of original architectural models, interior reconstructions, drawings, furniture, vintage photographs, films, tapestries, paintings, sculpture and books by Le Corbusier himself. It also features important works by his collaborators and artistic contemporaries such as Charlotte Perriand, Jean Prouvé, Fernand Léger and Amédée Ozenfant.

The exhibition charts how Le Corbusier’s work changed dramatically over the years; from his early houses inspired by the regional vernacular of his native Switzerland, the iconic Purist architecture and interiors for which he is best known, his master plan for Paris in the 1920s, the shift to organic forms in the 1930s, and the dynamic synthesis achieved between his art and architecture as exemplified by his chapel at Ronchamp (1950-55), and his civic buildings in Chandigarh, India (1952-64).

Highlights include a monumental mural painting, Femme et coquillage IV (1948) from his own office at Rues de Sèvres, Paris; a reconstruction of his Plan Voisin for Paris (1925); a complete original kitchen by Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand from his famous Unité d’habitation, Marseille (1947-50); original models of Ronchamp (1950-55), Unité d’habitation (1945-52), Parliament Building Chandigarh (1951-64) amongst others; and the film version of Le Corbusier and Edgard Varèse’s Poème Electronique (1958).

The exhibition has been curated by Le Corbusier scholars, Stanislaus von Moos and Arthur Rüegg, alongside VITRA Design Museum curator Mateo Kries. It is organised by VITRA Design Museum in co-operation with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Trust and the Netherlands Architecture Insititute.

The Barbican presentation of the exhibition, a collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Trust who open the show in Liverpool this autumn, will include a number of significant additions, among them Fernand Leger’s The Baluster (1925), on loan from the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Originally exhibited in the Pavillon de l’Esprit Nouveau, which Le Corbusier designed for the 1925 International Exposition of Decorative Arts in Paris, this is a very rare opportunity for this important work to be seen in London.

Barbican’s celebration of Le Corbusier highlights this connection between the arts with a full programme of concerts, films and talks to accompany the exhibition, including a day (7 March 2009) presented by the BBC Symphony Orchestra dedicated to the composer Iannis Xenakis who worked as an architect in Le Corbusier’s studio. The exhibition also offers a unique opportunity to see the influence of Le Corbusier’s architecture and ideas on the Barbican complex, designed by Chamberlin, Powell and Bonn in the late 1950s.

Le Corbusier, Villa Savoye, Poissy, 1928-31. Photographer Mondadori Electa/Arcaid.co.uk, courtesy of Arcaid, © FLC, Paris and DACS, London 2009.

 

Portrait of Le Corbusier, 1960-65 © FLC, Paris and DACS, London 2009.