Zaha Hadid, BMW Central building, Leipzig, Germany, 2002-05.

Zaha Hadid's Pritzker Prize-winning Architectural Deconstruction

Zaha Hadid, the Peak, Hong Kong, China, detail, 1982–83. Painting.

Zaha Hadid, Serif 1 wall shelf, 2006, Polyester resin. 17.8 x 304.8 x 36.8 cm, Produced by Established & Sons, UK, from the Seamless Collection. Number nine from an edition of 12. Back inset with two brass roundels.

 

Design Museum
Shad Thames
London SE1 2YD
0870 833 9955
Zaha Hadid —
Architecture and Design

June 29-November 25, 2007

Zaha Hadid won the Pritzker Prize in 2004, when she had only just completed her first substantial project, the Rosenthal Centre for Contemporary Art in Cincinnati. Now she is busy working on projects that range from masterplans in Singapore and Istanbul, to an opera house in China, a museum in Rome, and a skyscraper in Dubai. In the last year Hadid has opened two substantial buildings in Germany: a car factory for BMW and the Phaeno Science Centre, for which she was shortlisted for the 2006 RIBA Stirling Prize. Both have triumphantly demonstrated her ability to translate the essence of her virtuoso spatial invention in solid form.

The Design Museum exhibition will be the first full scale show of Zaha Hadid’s work in the UK. It will also be one of the largest projects undertaken by the Design Museum, spread over two floors of galleries, and will focus on this recent extraordinarily productive period in Hadid’s work.

Hadid CBE (born October 31, 1950, Baghdad, Iraq), a notable Iraqi-British deconstructivist architect, she received a degree in mathematics from the American University of Beirut before moving to study at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London. After graduating she worked with her former teacher, Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas at the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, becoming a partner in 1977. It was with Koolhaas that she met Peter Rice who gave her support and encouragement early on, at a time when her work seemed difficult to build. In 1980 she established her own London-based practice. During the 1980s she also taught at the Architectural Association. She has also taught at prestigious institutions around the world; she held the Kenzo Tange Chair at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, the Sullivan Chair at the University of Illinois School of Architecture in Chicago, guest professorships at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg, the Knolton School of Architecture, Ohio, the Masters Studio at Columbia University, New York and the Eero Saarinen Visiting Professor of Architectural Design at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. In addition, she was made Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. She is currently Professor at the University of Applied Arts Vienna in Austria.

A winner of many international competitions, theoretically influential and groundbreaking, a number of Hadid's winning designs were initially never built: notably, The Peak Club in Hong Kong (1983) and the Cardiff Bay Opera House in Wales (1994). In 2002 Hadid won the international design competition to design Singapore's one-north masterplan. In 2005, her design won the competition for the new city casino of Basel, Switzerland. In 2004 Hadid became the first female recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, architecture's equivalent of the Nobel Prize. Previously, she had been awarded a CBE for services to architecture. She is a member of the editorial board of the Encyclopædia Britannica. In 2006, Hadid was honoured with a retrospective spanning her entire work at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. In that year she also received an Honorary Degree from the American University of Beirut.

Zaha Hadid, Aqua table, detail, 2005. Image courtesy Established & Sons, London, UK.

Zaha Hadid, Phaeno Science Center, Wolfsburg, Germany, 2000–05.