Anish Kapoor, Sky Mirror, Red 2007, Installation view Kensington Gardens, London, (28 September 2010-13 March 2011), © 2010 Dave Morgan.

Anish Kapoor, C-Curve 2007, Stainless steel, 220 x 770 x 300 cm, © 2010 Anish Kapoor, Courtesy of the Artist and Lisson Gallery, London.

An Aggregation of Recent Anish Kapoor Works in Kensington Gardens

Anish Kapoor, Non Object (Spire) 2007, Stainless steel, 302 x 300 x 300 cm, © 2010 Anish Kapoor, Courtesy of the Artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.

Anish Kapoor, Sky Mirror 2006, Stainless steel, 1066.8 x 1066.8 cm, © 2010 Anish Kapoor, Courtesy of the Artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.

 

Serpentine Gallery
Kensington Gardens
020 7402 6075
London
Anish Kapoor: Turning the World
Upside Down in Kensington Gardens

September 28, 2010-March 13, 2011

The Royal Parks and the Serpentine Gallery present a major exhibition of large scale outdoor sculptures by acclaimed London-based artist Anish Kapoor in Kensington Gardens.

The exhibition showcases a series of major recent works never before shown together in London. Constructed from highly reflective stainless steel, the giant curved mirror surfaces will create illusory distortions of the surroundings and will be visible across large distances, creating new vistas in this famous and much- loved setting.

The sculptures are sited to contrast and reflect the changing colours, foliage and weather in Kensington Gardens. Despite their monumental scale, the works appear as pure reflection of their surroundings: the sky, trees, water, wildlife and changing seasons. The distortions in the works’ mirror-like surfaces call into question the viewers’ relationship to both the work itself and the surrounding environment.

Mark Camley, Chief Executive of The Royal Parks said: “The arts have always been an important part of The Royal Parks and we are delighted to be working with such an acclaimed artist as Anish Kapoor and with the respected Serpentine Gallery on this ambitious exhibition. We hope to build on the achievements of this project in the future and develop a regular programme of prestige exhibitions in our wonderful spaces.”

Julia Peyton-Jones, Director and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co Director, Serpentine Gallery, said: “This exhibition has been realized in a groundbreaking partnership between The Royal Parks and the Serpentine Gallery and forms part of the Serpentine Gallery’s 40th Anniversary Programme. The Gallery is delighted to be part of this ambitious partnership and looks forward to further projects in the future.”

Kapoor was born in Bombay in 1954 and has lived in London since the early 1970s when he studied at Hornsey College of Art and Chelsea School of Art and Design. Over the past twenty years he has exhibited extensively in London and worldwide. His solo shows have included Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2009; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, 2008; Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007; Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2003; Hayward Gallery, London, 1998 and Tate Gallery, London, 1990.

The exhibition is organised by The Royal Parks and the Serpentine Gallery and is supported by Lisson Gallery, Gladstone Gallery and anonymous donors. It is part of the Serpentine Gallery’s 40th anniversary exhibition programme and initiates a new arts strategy by The Royal Parks.

Anish Kapoor, Non-Object (Spire) 2007, Installation view Kensington Gardens, London, (28 September 2010-13 March 2011), © 2010 Dave Morgan.

Anish Kapoor, C-Curve 2007, Installation view Kensington Gardens, London, (28 September 2010-13 March 2011), © 2010 Dave Morgan.

Anish Kapoor, Sky Mirror, Red 2007, Installation view Kensington Gardens, London, (28 September 2010-13 March 2011), © 2010 Dave Morgan.

Anish Kapoor, Svayambh, 2007, Wax and oil-based paint, Dimensions variable, Photo: Cecile Clos, Nantes, Installation: Musee des Beaux-Arts de Nantes.

Anish Kapoor's Exercises in Engaging the Viewer on a Spiritual Level

Anish Kapoor, Shooting into the Corner, 2008-2009, Mixed media, Dimensions variable, Installation: Anish Kapoor. Shooting into the Corner, 2009, MAK, Vienna, Photo: Wolfgang Woessner, Courtesy: the artist and MAK, Vienna.

Anish Kapoor, Yellow, 1999, Fibreglass and pigment, 600 x 600 x 300 cm, Photo: Dave Morgan, Installation: Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007-08.

Anish Kapoor, Photo: Johnny Shand-Kydd.

 

Guggenheim Museum
Bilbao
Abandoibarra Et. 2
+34 944359000
Bilbao
Spain
Anish Kapoor
March 16-October 22, 2010

Anish Kapoor, 1991 Turner Prize winner, is regarded as one of the most influential and pioneering sculptors of his generation and is celebrated for works which enter into a profound spiritual engagement with the viewer such as the early pigment sculptures; 1000 Names (1979-80), Marsyas (2002) part of the Unilever Series at the Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, and Sky Mirror, installed at Rockefeller Center, New York in 2006.

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents a monographic exhibition on Anish Kapoor. The show was tremendously successful at the Royal Academy of Arts in London and has been organized in close collaboration with the artist.

This exhibition surveys Kapoor’s career to date as well as showcase new and previously unseen works. One of the highlights of the exhibition is the monumental work Svayambh, (a Sanskrit word which roughly translates as "auto-generated"). The work has the appearance of a vast mass of wax that moves almost imperceptibly on sunken rails leaving a residue in its wake as it traverses the breadth of Burlington House. This emblematic work reflects Kapoor’s exploration of sculptural works that actively participate in their own formation.

Another highlight of the exhibition is Shooting into the Corner (2009), displayed in the Large Weston and Small Weston Rooms. A cannon shoots projectiles of red wax into a corner at regular intervals. Relentlessly repeating this action, the work evolves over the duration of the exhibition as the build up of wax takes on its own form against the walls and the floor of the galleries. The spectacle surrounding the firing of the cannon and the accumulation of the wax produces a work of extraordinary complexity and drama.

Also included in the exhibition is a group of early pigment pieces, stainless steel reflective sculptures as well as newly created works, including a major new sculpture, sited in the Annenberg Courtyard.

Born in India, 1954, Anish Kapoor studied at Hornsey College of Art, London (1973-1977) and at Chelsea School of Art, London (1977-1978).

Kapoor’s first solo exhibition was held at Patrice Alexandre, Paris in 1980. His international reputation was quickly established, with an array of solo exhibitions held in countries around the world. Kapoor represented Britain in the Paris Biennale in 1982, and again in 1990 at the Venice Biennale, for which he was awarded Premio Duemila. The following year he won the prestigious Turner Prize Award. Anish Kapoor has recently acted as Guest Artistic Director of the Brighton Festival 2009.

Kapoor was elected Royal Academician in 1999 and has been awarded Honorary Fellowships by the London Institute and Leeds University (1997), University of Wolverhampton (1999) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (2001). He lives and works in London.

The exhibition is curated by independent curator Jean de Loisy in conjunction with Dr. Adrian Locke, Exhibitions Curator, Royal Academy of Arts. The exhibition is organised by the Royal Academy of Arts in partnership with the Lisson Gallery, London, Gladstone Gallery, New York, and Anish Kapoor Studio.

The exhibition is accompanied by a full colour catalogue published by Royal Academy Publications. This richly illustrated book traces Kapoor’s artistic development over a career spanning more than 30 years. Eminent scholars and critics explore the philosophical issues pertinent to his work and examine its place in the history of modern sculpture and in the context of contemporary practice.

Anish Kapoor, White sand, Red millet, Many Flowers, 1982, Mixed media and pigment, 4 elements, 101 x 241.5 x 217.4 cm, Collection Arts Council, South Bank Centre, London.

Anish Kapoor, Computer-generated image of Memory (2008) installed at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2008, Image: Courtesy Aerotrope Limited.

Anish Kapoor's Memory, 24 Tons of Vast, Raw Industrial Poetry

Anish Kapoor, Memory, 2008, Cor-Ten steel, 14.5 x 8.97 x 4.48 m, Commissioned by Deutsche Bank AG in consultation with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation for the Deutsche Guggenheim, Installation view: Anish Kapoor: Memory, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, November 30, 2008-February 1, 2009, Photo: Mathias Schormann, © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Anish Kapoor, Memory, 2008, Cor-Ten steel, 14.5 x 8.97 x 4.48 m, Commissioned by Deutsche Bank AG in consultation with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation for the Deutsche Guggenheim, Installation view: Anish Kapoor: Memory, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, November 30, 2008-February 1, 2009, Photo: Mathias Schormann, © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Anish Kapoor, Memory, 2008, Cor-Ten steel, 14.5 x 8.97 x 4.48 m, Commissioned by Deutsche Bank AG in consultation with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation for the Deutsche Guggenheim, Installation view: Anish Kapoor: Memory, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, November 30, 2008-February 1, 2009, Photo: Mathias Schormann, © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Anish Kapoor, Memory, 2008, Cor-Ten steel, 14.5 x 8.97 x 4.48 m, Commissioned by Deutsche Bank AG in consultation with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation for the Deutsche Guggenheim, Installation view: Anish Kapoor: Memory, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, November 30, 2008-February 1, 2009, Photo: Mathias Schormann, © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Anish Kapoor, Svayambh, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, 2007.

 

Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
212-423-3500
New York
Anish Kapoor: Memory
October 21, 2009-March 28, 2010

Memory (2008), a major new site-specific sculpture installation by leading international artist Anish Kapoor, is the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation’s first collaboration with the artist, who is celebrated for his expansive and profound aesthetic vision. The work is he 14th in a series of artist projects commissioned by Deutsche Bank and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation for the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin.

Since the late 1970s, Kapoor has extended the scope and language of contemporary sculpture through his explorations of scale, color, and the concept of the void. Constructed of Cor-Ten steel — a new material for the artist —Memory is a milestone for Kapoor. The work is composed of 154 Cor-Ten steel tiles, measures 14.5 x 8.97 x 4.48 meters overall, and weighs 24 tons. Its form nearly fills the gallery it occupies, challenging and altering the museum’s architecture through its improbable scale and proportions. The title, Memory, alludes to how visitors encounter the work, which can never be seen in its entirety and remains largely hidden from view.

This exhibition is made possible by Deutsche Bank.

Additional support is provided by the International Director’s Council of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Anish Kapoor: Memory was initiated in 2006 by Alexandra Munroe, Senior Curator of Asian Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and is curated by Sandhini Poddar, Assistant Curator of Asian Art. In early 2007, Kapoor was invited to create a site-specific work capable of engaging two very different exhibition locations: the Deutsche Guggenheim, where the work debuted in November 2008, and the Guggenheim Museum. “The Guggenheim Museum is delighted to present Anish Kapoor’s Memory in New York in our Deutsche Bank series of commissioned works by leading contemporary artists,” remarked Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Museum. “This show is presented as part of the museum’s 50th Anniversary program, and underscores our commitment to the importance of working with living artists,” continued Armstrong.

Kapoor’s earlier large-scale site-specific installations, such as Taratantara (1999), Marsyas (2002), and Svayambh (2007), succeeded in creating new perceptions of space through their distortions of scale. Continuing these types of distortions, Memory’s enormous scale prevents viewers from perceiving a gestalt. The work divides the gallery space into several distinct viewing areas, which can be approached either from the museum ramps, elevator banks, or the adjacent gallery. Visitors to the Guggenheim Museum are compelled to navigate different sections of the building as each vantage point offers only a glimpse of either the sculpture’s exterior form or its interior shell. This processional method of viewing the sculpture is an intrinsic aspect of the work. Kapoor asks visitors to connect and construct the fragmented images of Memory retained in their minds and thus exert more effort in their acts of seeing. Kapoor calls this process creating a “mental sculpture.”

As a 24-ton volume of Cor-Ten steel, Memory is vast, ineffable, raw, and industrial. Compressed into one of the Guggenheim Museum’s annex galleries, the sculpture’s sheer volume is foreboding, as its peripheries glance against the gallery walls and ceiling with the utmost precision. From within, Memory’s seamless eight-millimeter-thick steel tiles, meticulously manufactured to ensure absolute darkness inside, read as one continuous form. Viewable only through a two-square-meter aperture, these seamless tiles create the boundless void of Memory’s cavernous interior. Kapoor has created a sculpture whose interior space seems much more vast than that defined by its exterior form. A staircase leading from the adjacent gallery offers a view through the aperture. The precise wedging of this hole into the gallery wall defines a flat, two-dimensional plane that, from a certain distance, appears as a painting rather than an opening. Kapoor’s interest in this pictorial effect is best reflected in his frequently quoted statement, “I am a painter working as a sculptor.”

This new commission was engineered by Aerotrope Limited and manufactured by Centraalstaal B.V. in Groningen, Netherlands.

Anish Kapoor was born in 1954 in Bombay (now Mumbai), India, and currently lives and works in London. Kapoor has exhibited extensively both internationally and in London; his solo shows have included venues such as the Kunsthalle Basel; Tate Modern, London; Hayward Gallery, London; Museo national centro de arte Reina Sofia, Palacio de Velázquez, Madrid; CAPC Museé d’art contemporain, Bordeaux, France; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and MAK–Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst/Gegenwartskunst, Vienna. He represented Britain at the 1990 Venice Biennale and was awarded its Premio Duemila prize. He was the recipient of the prestigious Turner Prize, awarded in 1991. He has undertaken a number of major large-scale installations and commissions, including Taratantara (BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, England, 1999, and Piazza del Plebicito, Naples, 2000-01), Marsyas (Tate Modern, London, 2002-03), Cloud Gate (Millennium Park, Chicago, 2004-present), Sky Mirror (Rockefeller Center, New York, 2006) and Svayambh (Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007-08). Kapoor also has a major solo exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts in London in fall 2009.

The accompanying exhibition catalogue offers in-depth analyses of Kapoor’s creative intellectual process and documents Memory’s development from the initial models to its final form at the Deustche Guggenheim and the Guggenheim Museum. The richly illustrated publication features a comprehensive exhibition history and bibliography, and provides a broad critical framework with multidisciplinary essays by Henri Lustiger-Thaler, Professor of Cultural Sociology, Ramapo College; Poddar; Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, university professor and Director of the Center for Comparative Literature and Society, Columbia University; Steven Holl, Principal of Steven Holl Architects, with David van der Leer, Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and Christopher Hornzee-Jones, Director, Aerotrope Limited. Priced at $45 (hardcover), the exhibition catalogue Anish Kapoor: Memory can be purchased at the Guggenheim Store or at the Online Store at guggenheimstore.org.

Portrait of Anish Kapoor, Photo: Phillipe Chancel, 2007.

Anish Kapoor, Svayambh, 2007, Wax and oil-based paint, Dimensions variable, Photo: Cecile Clos, Nantes, Installation: Musee des Beaux-Arts de Nantes.

Kapoor's Sculpture, Media that Collaborates with the Maker

Anish Kapoor, Shooting into the Corner, 2008-2009, Mixed media, Dimensions variable, Installation: Anish Kapoor. Shooting into the Corner, 2009, MAK, Vienna, Photo: Wolfgang Woessner, Courtesy: the artist and MAK, Vienna.

Anish Kapoor, Yellow, 1999, Fibreglass and pigment, 600 x 600 x 300 cm, Photo: Dave Morgan, Installation: Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007-08.

Anish Kapoor, Photo: Johnny Shand-Kydd.

 

Royal Academy of Arts
Burlington House
Piccadilly
020 7300 8000
London
Main Galleries
Anish Kapoor
September 26-
December 11, 2009

Anish Kapoor, 1991 Turner Prize winner, is regarded as one of the most influential and pioneering sculptors of his generation and is celebrated for works which enter into a profound spiritual engagement with the viewer such as the early pigment sculptures; 1000 Names (1979-80), Marsyas (2002) part of the Unilever Series at the Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, and Sky Mirror, installed at Rockefeller Center, New York in 2006.

This exhibition surveys Kapoor’s career to date as well as showcase new and previously unseen works. One of the highlights of the exhibition is the monumental work Svayambh, (a Sanskrit word which roughly translates as "auto-generated"). The work has the appearance of a vast mass of wax that moves almost imperceptibly on sunken rails leaving a residue in its wake as it traverses the breadth of Burlington House. This emblematic work reflects Kapoor’s exploration of sculptural works that actively participate in their own formation.

Another highlight of the exhibition is Shooting into the Corner (2009), displayed in the Large Weston and Small Weston Rooms. A cannon shoots projectiles of red wax into a corner at regular intervals. Relentlessly repeating this action, the work evolves over the duration of the exhibition as the build up of wax takes on its own form against the walls and the floor of the galleries. The spectacle surrounding the firing of the cannon and the accumulation of the wax produces a work of extraordinary complexity and drama.

Also included in the exhibition is a group of early pigment pieces, stainless steel reflective sculptures as well as newly created works, including a major new sculpture, sited in the Annenberg Courtyard.

Born in India, 1954, Anish Kapoor studied at Hornsey College of Art, London (1973-1977) and at Chelsea School of Art, London (1977-1978).

Kapoor’s first solo exhibition was held at Patrice Alexandre, Paris in 1980. His international reputation was quickly established, with an array of solo exhibitions held in countries around the world. Kapoor represented Britain in the Paris Biennale in 1982, and again in 1990 at the Venice Biennale, for which he was awarded Premio Duemila. The following year he won the prestigious Turner Prize Award. Anish Kapoor has recently acted as Guest Artistic Director of the Brighton Festival 2009.

Kapoor was elected Royal Academician in 1999 and has been awarded Honorary Fellowships by the London Institute and Leeds University (1997), University of Wolverhampton (1999) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (2001). He lives and works in London.

The exhibition is curated by independent curator Jean de Loisy in conjunction with Dr. Adrian Locke, Exhibitions Curator, Royal Academy of Arts. The exhibition is organised by the Royal Academy of Arts in partnership with the Lisson Gallery, London, Gladstone Gallery, New York, and Anish Kapoor Studio.

The exhibition is accompanied by a full colour catalogue published by Royal Academy Publications. This richly illustrated book traces Kapoor’s artistic development over a career spanning more than 30 years. Eminent scholars and critics explore the philosophical issues pertinent to his work and examine its place in the history of modern sculpture and in the context of contemporary practice.

Anish Kapoor, White sand, Red millet, Many Flowers, 1982, Mixed media and pigment, 4 elements, 101 x 241.5 x 217.4 cm, Collection Arts Council, South Bank Centre, London.

Anish Kapoor, Ascension, 2007, Site specific project, Galleria Continua Beijing 2007, Photograph Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt.

Anish Kapoor Summons up Apparitions and a Higher Ground

Anish Kapoor, Ascension, 2007, Site specific project, Galleria Continua Beijing 2007.

Anish Kapoor, Ascension, 2007, Site specific project, Galleria Continua Beijing 2007, Photograph Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt.

 

Galleria Continua
Dashanzi 798 #8503
2 Jiuxianqiao Road
Chaoyang District
+86.10.64361005
Beijing
Anish Kapoor, Ascension
September 1-December 23, 2007

Anish Kapoor commits himself to construction, in every sense, evaluating the aesthetic perception of spaces rather than focusing on objects themselves. This is true for his large-scale installations as well as for his smaller art works, where the space is captured inside its earthly setting of the physical limits of the sensory matter, and is returned altered and deformed in a way that induces intensified perception and aesthetic experience. In the work of Anish Kapoor the meaning of the constructive act is immediate, especially whenever there are sensorial games or illusions: the void that can be perceived as surface, or creating shape; the reflection that overturns or erases the image; light that alters or modulates colour; figures that take shape as a result of physical and optical effects mystical ascensions, ghostly presences which lead elsewhere. The latter, in particular, can describe the impression that comes to the onlooker while entering Ascension latest installation in the Beijing Galleria Continua’s space.

A massive spiral pathway takes one through a sensorial experience that leads the witness from a low, half-shaded gate, through a darker, narrower corridor, to a final luminous opening. The claustrophobic feeling that invades one’s being is suddenly overcome by a revelation of ascending and ethereal apparition.

Known and admired for his enigmatic sculptural forms, this new corpus of works shows how Anish Kapoor continues his exploration of the antithesis: inner and outer, emptiness and fullness, presence and absence, the solid versus the intangible.

As Pier Luigi Tazzi wrote “One of the constants in the work of Anish Kapoor is the creation of clefts on the crust of the world, […] a crust pierced at different levels, at different heights or altitudes, with varying and different degrees of penetration, suggesting a multiplicity of directions and possibilities, of varied thickness and depth, of varied and different impact."

Kapoor was born in Bombay in 1954 and since the early 1970s lives in London where he studied at Hornsey College of Art and graduated at Chelsea School of Art Design.

Over the past 20 years Anish Kapoor has exhibited extensively in London and world-wide. His solo shows have included venues such as Kunsthalle Basel, Tate Gallery and Hayward Gallery in London, Reina Sofia in Madrid, CAPC in Bordeaux, CCBB Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil in Brasilia, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. He has also participated internationally in many group shows including The Royal Academy and Serpentine Gallery in London, Documenta IX in Kassel, Expo Seville in Seville, Moderna Museet in Stockholm and Centre Georges Pompidou and Louvre in Paris, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Nantes.

His work is included in numerous private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Palacio de Velazquez in Madrid and the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam own his art works. Kapoor’s interventions Marsyas at the Tate Modern Turbine Hall in London, Cloud Gate at Millennium Park in Chicago, Underground inside the medieval tower of Sant’Agostino in San Gimignano, and the Monte Sant'Angelo subway stations in Naples, are among his most acclaimed public commissions. Anish Kapoor was awarded the Premio Duemila at the Venice Biennale in 1990, the Turner Prize Award in 1991 and was awarded an Honorary Fellowship at the London Institute in 1997 and a CBE in 2003.

 

Anish Kapoor, Ascension, 2007, Site specific project, Galleria Continua Beijing 2007, Photograph Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt.

 

Anish Kapoor, Sky Mirror, 2006, Rockefeller Center, Midtown Manhattan, Stainless steel, 1067 cm diameter.

The Constructed Object in a Considered Space

Anish Kapoor, 1000 Names, 1979-80, Mixed media and pigment, 62", LeWitt Collection, Chester, Connecticut.

Anish Kapoor Inwendig Volle Figur, 2006, Paint and resin, 70.9 x 128 x 147.25", Courtesy of the artist and Lisson Gallery.

Anish Kapoor, S-Curve, 2006, Polished steel, Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

Institute
of Contemporary Art
100 Northern Avenue
Boston
617-478-3100
Anish Kapoor:
Past, Present, Future

May 30-
September 7, 2008

Sculptor Anish Kapoor — perhaps best known in this country for the popular public art work, Cloud Gate in Chicago’s Millennium Park — is the focus of a major exhibition this summer at the Institute of Contemporary Art / Boston. The show features 14 monumental works made since 1980, a period in which Kapoor's sculptures and installations have grown increasingly ambitious and complex. Many of the works are on view for the first time in the United States, including a new acrylic sculpture (Untitled, 2007). This is the first U.S. museum survey of Kapoor's art in more than 15 years.

Kapoor emerged as one of a highly inventive generation of British sculptors during the 1980s. His early work shows the influence of his Indian heritage in the use of raw colored pigments and traces of Indian architecture that provide a basis for a striking formal language. In the 1990s, these references evolved into a more abstract and complex exploration of the sculptural object, often investigating the relationships of opposites such as dark and light, presence and absence, solid and intangible. The effect can be astonishing and, at times, disorienting. Sometimes using the materials of classical sculpture, including stone and bronze, Kapoor also developed newly applied forms of aluminum, pigment, enamel, resin, polymer, and PVC.

Kapoor was born in Bombay, India, in 1954. He currently lives and works in London. Kapoor has had solo exhibitions in institutions around the world including the Kunsthaus Bregenz, the Museum of Modern Art, Slovenia, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, and the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art. He has also been included in numerous international group exhibitions including the Shanghai Biennale, the Lyon Biennale, Documenta IX, and the Venice Biennale. Kapoor has created major installations for the Tate Modern, London; the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead; and Millennium Park, Chicago. In 1990, Kapoor was awarded "Premio Duemila" at the Venice Biennale, and in 1991, he was awarded the prestigious Turner Prize. Cloud Gate, his monumental permanent sculpture in Chicago’s Millennium Park, will soon be joined by a stone monument in New York’s Hanover Square for the British Memorial Garden, commemorating the British victims of 9/11.

The exhibition Anish Kapoor: Past, Present, Future is accompanied by a comprehensive catalogue including an interview with the curator, Nicholas Baume, and further contributions by Partha Mitter, Emeritus Professor of Art History at the University of Sussex, and Mary Jane Jacob, Professor and Chair of Sculpture, School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The book is available for purchase in the ICA Store.

 

Anish Kapoor, Cloud Gate, 2004, Millennium Park, Chicago, Stainless steel, 1006 x 2012 x 1280 cm.