Hans Bellmer, La Poupée. Seconde partie, undated (1936?), portfolio with 8 hand-coloured and 3 black-and-white photographs on cardboard, each 5,3 x 5,4 cm, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg.

Louise Bourgeois, Crouching spider, 2003, brons, zwart en mat patina en roestvrij staal, 270,5 x 835,7 x 627,4 cm, Particuliere collectie Nederland.

Louise Bourgeois, Hans Bellmer, and the Psychology of Family Dynamics

Louise Bourgeois, The Couple, 2002, aluminium, 38,1 x 22,8 x 12,6 cm, About Change Collection.

Louise Bourgeois, Fragile Goddess, 2002, fabric, 31,7 x 12,7 x 15,2 cm, Privatsammlung, Courtesy Barbara Gross Galerie, München.

Louise Bourgeois, Avenza, 1968-1969, latex en vibreglass, 53,3 x 76,2 x 116,8 cm, Courtesy Cheim & Read, Hauser & Wirth and Galerie Karsten Greve.

Hans Bellmer, La Poupée, 1936/1938, photo, vintage print, 76 x 50 cm, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg.

 

 

Gemeentemuseum Den Haag
Stadhouderslaan 41
31-(0)70-3381111
The Hague
Hans Bellmer - Louise Bourgeois
Double Sexus

September 11, 2010-January 16, 2011

The work of both Louise Bourgeois and Hans Bellmer is heavily influenced by childhood experience. In both cases, the relationship with a dominant father is an especially important factor. Louise Bourgeois was born in Paris in 1911. Her father was a high-handed, authoritarian man who openly pursued a sexual relationship with his children’s governess. He belittled Bourgeois from childhood on and made her feel that, as a woman, she was necessarily inferior. In retaliation for a denigrating remark from her father, she once made a model of his body out of bread and spit. Then she took a knife and cut off its arms and legs one by one. She cited this as her first ever sculptural solution and said that the resulting sense of satisfaction was a major driving force behind all her subsequent works of art. She often stressed that sculpture allowed her to relive the past and come to terms with it.

The new cultural season at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag opens with an exhibition on artist Louise Bourgeois, who died May 29, 2010. The exhibition confronts her work with that of Hans Bellmer. It is the very last exhibition on which Bourgeois collaborated in person. The confrontation of her work with that of Surrealist artist Bellmer appealed strongly to her. Gemeentemuseum Director Benno Tempel said: "Despite her advanced years, Louise Bourgeois’ death came as a surprise. She carried on working with amazing energy right to the end and she was heavily involved in the preparations for this show."

Although Bourgeois began producing sculpture at an early age, she was around 70 before she achieved renown. After that, she had major exhibitions in venues such as Tate Modern and Centre Pompidou and represented America at the 1993 Venice Biennale. Her vast bronze spiders became world-famous and one of them is on display in September in the pond in front of Gemeentemuseum.

Bellmer was born in Katowice (now Poland) in 1902. His father ruled the family with an iron fist and Bellmer was driven to produce his artworks by his powerlessness in the face of his father’s authoritarianism (his first doll had to be made in secret). Eventually, he turned not only against his father, but also against the rationalism and National Socialism of the society in which he lived. Bellmer’s work sits firmly within the Surrealist tradition, in which the influence of the subconscious mind and sexual urges is very great.

The work is characterised by a search for identity, an exploration of relations between the sexes and a fascination with the human body and the possibilities of sculpting it. By melding male and female, experimenting with the merging of sexual identities in dolls, photographs and drawings, Bellmer undermines the conventional balance of power between the sexes.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a lavishly illustrated catalogue containing contributions from eminent figures such as Elfriede Jelinek and Henry Miller (Ludion, price € 34.95 from the museum shop, € 39.95 elsewhere).

Hans Bellmer, Das Durchdrungene Geheimnis der Diana von Ephesus (objet), 1938, Pencil, watercolour, opaque white on cardboard, 21 x 15 cm, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg.

Hans Bellmer, Die Puppe (Rumpf), 1935/1965, cast aluminium on a gold-patinated bronze pedestal, 50 x 27 x 25 cm, Sammlung Ulla and Heiner Pietzsch, Berlin.

Hans Bellmer, La Toupie, 1965-1968, plaster on bronze pedestal, 34 x 12 x 12 cm, Virgina Lust Gallery, New York.

Hans Bellmer, La Poupée. Seconde partie, undated (1936?), portfolio with 8 hand-coloured and 3 black-and-white photographs on cardboard, each 5,3 x 5,4 cm, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg.

 

Louise Bourgeois, Cell XXVI, 2003, steel. Fabric, aluminium, stainless steel and wood, 252,7 x 434,3 x 304,8 cm, courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.