Gabriel Orozco, Sandstars, 2012, Approximately 1,200 found objects, including wood, metal, glass, paper, plastic, Styrofoam, rock, rope, rubber, and other materials, and 13 photographic grids, each comprising 99 chromogenic prints. Found objects: overall dimensions vary with installation; photographs: each print 10.2 x 15.2 cm; each grid 123.2 x 147.3 x 5.1 cm. Installation view: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, July 6-Oct. 21, 2012

Gabriel Orozco, Finds from a Beach and a Floating Plastic Garbage Patch

Gabriel Orozco, Sandstars, 2012, Approximately 1,200 found objects, including wood, metal, glass, paper, plastic, Styrofoam, rock, rope, rubber, and other materials, and 13 photographic grids, each comprising 99 chromogenic prints. Found objects: overall dimensions vary with installation; photographs: each print 10.2 x 15.2 cm; each grid 123.2 x 147.3 x 5.1 cm. Installation view: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, July 6-Oct. 21, 2012.

Gabriel Orozco, Sandstars, 2012, Approximately 1,200 found objects, including wood, metal, glass, paper, plastic, Styrofoam, rock, rope, rubber, and other materials, and 13 photographic grids, each comprising 99 chromogenic prints. Found objects: overall dimensions vary with installation; photographs: each print 10.2 x 15.2 cm; each grid 123.2 x 147.3 x 5.1 cm. Installation view: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, July 6-Oct. 21, 2012

Installation view of Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, July 6-Oct. 21, 2012. Foreground and left: Astroturf Constellations (2012); background and right: Sandstars (2012). © Gabriel Orozco, 2012.

Gabriel Orozco, Sandstars, 2012, Approximately 1,200 found objects, including wood, metal, glass, paper, plastic, Styrofoam, rock, rope, rubber, and other materials, and 13 photographic grids, each comprising 99 chromogenic prints. Found objects: overall dimensions vary with installation; photographs: each print 10.2 x 15.2 cm; each grid 123.2 x 147.3 x 5.1 cm. Installation view: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, July 6-Oct. 21, 2012.

Objects being collected for Gabriel Orozco, Sandstars (2012) on Isla Arena, Baja California Sur, Mexico

 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
212-423-3500
New York
Annex Level 7
Asterisms
November 9, 2012-January 13, 2013

Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, a two-part sculptural and photographic installation by the Mexican-born artist, comprises thousands of items of detritus he gathered at two sites — a playing field near his home in New York and a protected coastal biosphere in Baja California Sur, Mexico, which is also the repository for flows of industrial and commercial waste from across the Pacific Ocean. The two newly commissioned works invoke several recurring themes in Orozco’s oeuvre, including the traces of erosion, poetic encounters with mundane materials, and the ever-present tension between nature and culture.

The exhibition is organized by Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, and Joan Young, Director, Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and is accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue. This exhibition is made possible by Deutsche Bank. The Leadership Committee for Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Asterisms marks the 18th project in the series of commissions organized by the Guggenheim Foundation and the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin, where it was on view through October 21, 2012. One component of the exhibition, Sandstars, responds to the unique environment encountered in Isla Arena, Mexico, a wildlife reserve, which is simultaneously a whale mating ground, whale cemetery, and industrial wasteland. Orozco has worked there before, having extracted from its sands the whale skeleton that forms the sculpture Mobile Matrix (2006), now permanently installed in the Biblioteca de México José Vasconcelos in Mexico City. His return to this sanctuary yielded entirely new results in response to the voluminous amounts of detritus deposited there by ocean currents. He created a large sculptural installation from the refuse he collected — including metal and plastic buoys, athletic balls, glass bottles, incandescent light bulbs, wooden oars, metal implements like screws and hinges, Styrofoam in various forms, construction-site hard hats, and ossified rolls of toilet paper — by subjecting it to taxonomic arrangement on the gallery floor. This monumental sculptural carpet of nearly 1,200 objects is accompanied by twelve large-scale gridded photographs of images of the individual objects in a studio setting, organized typologically by material, color, size, and so on. A 13th grid documents the landscape from which the objects were retrieved, along with incidental compositions made in situ from the castaway items. This framed pictorial inventory is shown in proximity to the sculptural accumulation, creating a kind of visual ricochet between an object and its representation. The effect is one of entropic dissolution tempered by rigorous order.

Included with Sandstars is a video, Whale after Waves (2012), which illuminates the environment of Isla Arena.

The second component, Astroturf Constellation, similarly explores taxonomic classification, but on a completely different scale. It comprises a collection of small bits of debris left behind by athletes and spectators in the Astroturf of a playing field on Pier 40 in New York, where the artist regularly throws boomerangs. Orozco displays these myriad items — including coins, sneakers logos, bits of soccer balls, candy wrappers, wads of chewing gum, and tangles of thread, again numbering nearly 1,200 — on a large platform. As in Sandstars, the objects are displayed alongside thirteen photographic grids, a combination that again underscores the nuanced relationship between sculpture and photography in Orozco’s oeuvre.

In the exhibition, and the commission as a whole, the two related bodies of work play off each other in a provocative oscillation between the macro and the micro. Asterisms also reveals and amplifies Orozco’s subtle practice of subjecting the world to personal, idiosyncratic systems.

Exhibition Catalogue The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue that includes an essay by Nancy Spector. The catalogue, designed by Kloepfer-Ramsey, costs $55 and will soon be available at guggenheimstore.org.

About Gabriel Orozco Gabriel Orozco (b. 1962, Jalapa, Mexico) attended the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico City and studied at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid.

Solo exhibitions of Orozco’s work have been presented at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (1995 and 1998), Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. (2004), Serpentine Gallery in London (2004), and Museo Nacional Centre de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid (2005), among other venues. Traveling retrospectives have been organized by the Kunsthalle Zürich (1996-97), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (2000-01), and the Museum of Modern Art in New York (2009-10), which traveled to Kunstmuseum Basel (2010), Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris (2010-11), and Tate Modern in London (2011). His work has been included in such significant group exhibitions as the Venice Biennale (1993, 2003, and 2005), Whitney Biennial (1995 and 1997), Carnegie International (1999), and Documenta 10 and 11 (1997 and 2002). Orozco has received numerous awards, including the Secció Espacios Alternativos prize at the Salón Nacional de Artes Plásticas in Mexico City in 1987, a DAAD artist-in-residence grant in Berlin in 1995, and the blau orange Kunstpreis der Deutschen Volksbanken und Raiffeisenbanken in 2006. Orozco currently lives and works in New York, Paris, and Mexico City.

Gabriel Orozco, Astroturf Constellation (detail), 2012, 1,188 found objects, including plastic, glass, paper, metal, and other materials, and 13 photographic grids, framed, each comprising 99 chromogenic prints. Found objects: overall dimensions vary with installation; photographs: each print 10.2 x 15.2 cm, each grid 123.2 x 147.3 x 5.1 cm, © 2012 Gabriel Orozco.

 

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Atomist: Making Strides. 1996, Gouache and ink on newspaper clipping, 20.9 x 20.9 cm, Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Photo credit: John Berens, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), La DS. 1993, Modified Citroën DS, 140.1 x 482.5 x 115.1 cm, Fonds national d’art contemporain (Cnap), Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, Paris, Fnac 94003, Photography: Florian Kleinefenn, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco, an Innovative 20 years, and a Survey with a Whale

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Horses Running Endlessly. 1995, Wood, 8.7 x 87.5 x 87.5 cm, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Agnes Gund and Lewis B. Cullman in honor of Chess in the Schools, ©2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Elevator. 1994, Modified elevator cabin, 243.8 x 243.8 x 152.4 cm, The Dakis Joannou CollectionPhotography: Gabriel Orozco, ©2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Until You Find Another Yellow Schwalbe (detail). 1995, Forty chromogenic color prints, each 31.6 x 47.3 cm, Tate presented by George and Angie Loudon, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Empty Shoe Box. 1993, Shoe box, 12.4 x 33 x 21.6 cm, Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Yielding Stone. 1992 , Plasticine, 36.8 x 39.4 x 40.6 cm, Collection of the artist, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Mobile Matrix. (Detail.) 2006, Graphite on gray whale skeleton, 196 x 1089 x 266 cm, Biblioteca Vasconcelos, Mexico City, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Working Tables, 2000-2005. 2005, Unfired clay, straw, egg container, bottle caps, wiremesh screen, string, stones, shells, plaster, bark, polystyrene foam, painted wood elements, pizza dough, and other materials, dimensions variable, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase and gift of Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro and Donald B. Marron, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Yogurt Caps (detail). 1994, Four yogurt lids, each lid 7.9 cm diam., Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Photography: Tom Powel, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Mobile Matrix. 2006, Graphite on gray whale skeleton, 196 x 1089 x 266 cm, Biblioteca Vasconcelos, Mexico City, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Eyes Under Elephant Foot. 2009, Beaucarnea trunk and glass eyes, 147 x 144.5 x 140 cm, Charpenel Collection, Guadalajara, Mexico, ©2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Four Bicycles (There Is Always One Direction). 1994, 198.1 x 223.5 x 223.5 cm, Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz Collection, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

 

Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
212-708-9400
New York
The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery, sixth floor
Gabriel Orozco
December 13, 2009-March 1, 2010
Donald B.
and Catherine C. Marron Atrium
Mobile Matrix
December 13, 2009-March 1, 2010
The Paul J. Sachs Prints
and Illustrated Books Galleries,
second floor
Gabriel Orozco:
Samurai Tree Invariants

December 9, 2009-March 1, 2010

Since the early 1990s Gabriel Orozco (Mexican, b. 1962) has forged a career marked by continuing innovation becoming a leading artist of his generation. This midcareer retrospective examines two decades of Orozco’s work in some 80 works, revealing how Orzco roams freely and fluently among drawing, photography, sculpture, installation, and painting creating a body of objects that resists categorization. Works in the exhibition come from international public and private collections, including the collection of The Museum of Modern Art. Gabriel Orozco is organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, with Paulina Pobocha, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Mobile Matrix (2006), a monumental sculpture composed of a reassembled gray-whale skeleton, is installed on the second floor in the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium. Orozco was commissioned to make the sculpture by Mexico’s National Council for Culture and the Arts for its permanent home in the Biblioteca Vasconcelos in Mexico City. Its inclusion in this exhibition marks the first time it has been seen outside of that library. After excavating the bones from the Isla Arena in Baja California Sur, Orozco and a team of approximately 20 assistants used some 6,000 mechanical pencils to draw lines on the whale that relate to its structure. Dark solid circles are surrounded by numerous series of concentric rings that overlap and collide with each other.

Samurai Tree Invariants (2006), is comprised of a digital-print installation and computer animation, acquired for the Museum’s collection in 2008. Of the 672 prints in the series, 460 are on view in this exhibition. Limiting himself to the circle’s simple form and only four colors, Orozco multiplied, reduced, and shifted these elements according to a pre-determined system to create hundreds of sequential compositions on screen and paper. The resulting installation is an immersive space that combines digital precision with organic mutability, to mesmerizing effect. Orozco’s Samurai Tree Invariants represents an expanded concept of printmaking that embraces digital technology and encompasses installation art. The exhibition is organized by Gretchen L. Wagner, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Prints and Illustrated Books, The Museum of Modern Art.

Explains Ms. Temkin, "Orozco’s transformation of the concept of sculpture — via innumerable mediums and methods — makes him a central figure of his generation. Sixteen years after his debut in MoMA’s Projects series, this exhibition explores both the consistency and the surprising evolution of his artistic approach."

Orozco was born in 1962 in Jalapa, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, to Cristina Félix Romandía, a student of classical piano, and Mario Orozco Rivera, a mural painter and art professor at the Universidad Veracruzana. In 1981, Orozco enrolled at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas (ENAP), a division of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), from which he graduated in 1984. In 1986, to broaden his knowledge of contemporary art practice, Orozco
left Mexico City for Madrid. There he enrolled in courses at the Círculo de Bellas Artes and, using Madrid as a base, traveled throughout Europe; but by 1987, he returned to Mexico City. He formed a workshop with other artists—Damián Ortega, Gabriel Kuri, Abraham Cruzvillegas, and Dr. Lakra (Jerónimo López Ramírez)—and worked with this group for the next five years.

Orozco spent the 1990s traveling to cities throughout the world, and many of his works are emblematic of the locations where they were made. Bringing together objects originally created for autonomous settings and contexts, Orozco and Ms. Temkin have conceived this exhibition as a new landscape. Rather than offering a chronological or linear account of Orozco’s body of work, this exhibition celebrates the experimentation that lies at the heart of his practice. Orozco’s works are variously cerebral and spontaneous, convivial and hushed, the result of painstaking planning and fortunate accident. The exhibition highlights the diversity of Orozco’s materials and the variety of his methods while presenting an oeuvre that is unique in its formal power and intellectual rigor.

Art and life combine in Orozco’s work. Shown for the first time outside Mexico, a new work titled Eyes Under Elephant Foot (2009) is made of a section of a Beaucarnea tree trunk into which glass eyes have been set. To create My Hands Are My Heart (1991), the artist squeezed a ball of clay between his two hands, forming a heart-shaped object that reveals the process of its making. Rather than using a fine-art material, Orozco used clay made in a brick factory in Mexico. Like many of his early works, this object proceeds from a modesty of materials and simplicity of gesture, reducing the act of sculptural creation to its bare but potent essentials. Nearby are two photographs showing the artist with My Hands Are My Heart, exemplifying the close relationship that exists between photography and sculpture in Orozco’s work.

Among the works recreated here, only one is presented in a way that echoes its original installation: Yogurt Caps (1994), which was first shown in Orozco’s debut exhibition at Marian Goodman Gallery in New York in 1994. Four blue-rimmed Dannon yogurt lids affixed to four otherwise empty walls punctuate the visual field so minimally as to be barely perceptible; by demarcating the perimeter of the gallery, Orozco’s intervention throws the emptiness of the room into focus.

For many of his sculptures from the 1990s, Orozco altered ready-made objects, such as an elevator, a car, or a bicycle. Without concealing the original object’s function or transforming its principal identity, he instead heightened its defining characteristics. La DS (1993) is a streamlined version of the already sleek Citroën DS, made in Paris, where the cars were manufactured. Orozco cut a 1960s model in thirds lengthwise, removed about two feet of width from the center, and reassembled the two remaining sections to create a version of the original that exaggerates its aerodynamic design.

Photography has been an essential component of Orozco’s practice throughout his career. There are images of objects he manipulated into sometimes poetic or humorous assemblages, and straightforward pictures of ready-made sculptural situations just as he found them. Until You Find Another Yellow Schwalbe (1995), comprising 40 color prints, is Orozco’s lighthearted diary of his travels around Berlin. While riding his own yellow Schwalbe scooter — a popular motorbike produced in East Germany during the 1960s — he searched for other yellow Schwalbe scooters. Orozco parked his scooter next to nearly identical ones as he found them, and photographed them, eventually forming the series of 40 prints. By photographing these East German relics that punctuate the landscape of a unified Berlin, Orozco invokes Germany’s divided past.

In 2004, Orozco began to paint circles first on canvas and then on wood. Using a computer and drafting software, Orozco created a design template for a large series of paintings collectively titled Samurai Tree Invariants (2004, ongoing). Every panel in the series features four colors (gold, white, red, and blue) distributed across the canvas based on the movement of a knight in a game of chess. Alongside the Invariants, Orozco has also produced a body of paintings, such as Kytes Tree (2005), whose compositional structures are unique to each work. Also on view are works like Fertile Structure (2008), made with graphite on a plaster-primed wood support. Melding painting and drawing, this recent work acknowledges the origins of Orozco’s painterly enterprise while suggesting the possibility of endless variation.

The provisional objects of Orozco’s Working Tables, 2000-2005 illustrate the artist’s hand and mind in action, and provide an intimate look at his working process. The tables display prototypes for finished works, the beginnings of projects never realized, and found objects the artist kept for one reason or another — all things on their way to becoming sculpture. Several of the objects included in Working Tables, 2000-2005 relate directly to the finished sculptures, such as Floating Sinking Shell 2 (2004) and Double Tail (2002).

The exhibition will travel to three other museums after MoMA: Kunstmuseum Basel (April 18 to August 10, 2010); Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (September 15, 2010, to January 3, 2011); and the Tate Modern, London (January 19 to April 25, 2011). Each exhibition will be a uniquely designed collaboration between the artist and the institution where it is presented.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue titled Gabriel Orozco, edited by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art. It was designed by Pure+Applied in collaboration with Orozco. Critical essays by Ann Temkin; Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, The Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Modern Art, Harvard University; and Briony Fer, Professor of Art History at University College, London, provide new approaches to grounding Orozco’s work in the larger landscape of contemporary art. They are complemented by a richly illustrated chronology by Paulina Pobocha, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Anne Byrd, an art historian and writer based in Brooklyn, New York, which combines biographical information with focused discussions of selected objects. These texts pay particular attention to Orozco’s material practice and introduce the artist’s own reflections on the work he has made. It is published by The Museum of Modern Art and is available at the MoMA Stores and online at www.momastore.org. It is distributed to the trade through Distributed Art Publishers (D.A.P) in the United States and Canada, and Thames + Hudson outside North America. Hardcover: 256 pages; 500 color illustrations. $55.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Untitled. 1993, Synthetic polymer paint, graphite, and marker on three sheets of paper, each sheet 26.7 x 20.3 cm, Agnes Gund Collection, New York, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Untitled. 1993, Synthetic polymer paint, graphite, and marker on three sheets of paper, each sheet 26.7 x 20.3 cm, Agnes Gund Collection, New York, Photography: Tom Powel, ©2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), My Hands Are My Heart. 1991, Two silver dye bleach prints, Each 23.2 x 31.8 cm, Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Black Kites. 1997, Graphite on skull, 21.6 x 12.7 x 15.9 cm, Philadelphia Museum of Art. Gift (by exchange) of Mr. and Mrs. James P. Magill, 1997, ©2009 Gabriel Orozco.

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Island Within an Island. 1993, Silver dye bleach print, 40.6 x 50.8 cm, Edition of 5, Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, ©2009 Gabriel Orozco.

 

Gabriel Orozco. (Mexican, born 1962), Korean Air. 1997, Ink and colored pencil on cut-and-pasted printed paper on paper, 28 x 21.6 cm, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia and Morris Orden, © 2009 Gabriel Orozco.