Henning Bohl, Cornet of Horse, 2011, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Cornet of Horse, 2011, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Back to School on Self-Referencing and Self-Exploitation


Henning Bohl, Nursery School Teacher 1&2, 2010 and Schneebälle anmalen mit Sprühfarbe, 2011, Holz, MDF, Pappe, Lack, Tür, Schultafellack, pulverbeschichtetes Metall, 100 x 190 x 40 cm, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Cornet of Horse, 2011, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Chaosium Inc., 2011 (rechts), Klappbürotische, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Frog Substitutes, 2011, PVC auf Polyester, Grundierte Leinwand, Keilrahmen, Fahrradhelme, Kevlarleine, Isilink, Gummiseil, Clamcleat CL 223 / 234, 13 x 100 x 20 cm, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Cornet of Horse, 2011, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

 

Kunstverein Hamburg
Klosterwall 23
+ 49 (0)40 32 21 57
Hamburg
Henning Bohl
Cornet of Horse

June 25-September 11, 2011

Cornet of Horse features several installation settings by Berlin-based artist Henning Bohl (born in 1975) that are linked both in terms of content and in terms of recurring motifs and materials and the way these are employed.

Besides referring to each other, Bohl’s works also contain numerous, often subtle references to other art (movements). While his use of references follows a certain logic, it does not necessarily aim to produce meaning. Bohl is more interested in creating arrangements that tell stories and in how they are told. The exhibition in Hamburg is centred around two objects that resemble tables insofar as they have four legs (made from Schultüten, paper cones that are filled with small gifts and given to German children on their first day of school), a horizontal frame (a stretcher frame of the type used for mounting canvasses) and an oversized “tabletop” (made of plywood and fibreboard). Only touching the ground on the tips of the four Schultüten, the objects appear to be in a precarious state of balance and almost seem to float. The stretcher frames — horizontally placed pictures, so to say — bulge upward towards the ceiling, as they are, in a sense, “hanging” from the floor on the paper cones. The Schultüten themselves display various images representing abundance and plenty — conveying the concept of a “cornucopia” on several different levels.

In the works in his Frog Substitutes series from 2011, which are also featured in the Hamburg show, Bohl uses elastic bands and rope to mount bicycle helmets into openings in the canvases – very literally applying his subject to the picture surface.

In addition to exploring various possibilities for generating picture motifs, Bohl also poses questions about the presentation and staging of art. Large-scale canvasses featuring collages of layered shapes cut from rolls of paper hang from plasterboard elements that are piled on sawhorses, creating their own architecture alongside the architecture of the exhibition space. This questioning on the part of the artist — which for him can never be finally resolved – causes the status of his work to be relativized in several different ways. Thus the pictures are relegated to the status of stage props, while the means of presentation take on an independent sculptural and conceptual significance of their own.

In keeping with this complex logic of (self-)exploitation, two of the bicycle helmet pictures turned up in a performance Bohl presented in Tokyo and Frankfurt with musician Sergei Tcherepnin and the artist Ei Arakawa. The two pictures were placed on loudspeaker stands across from two wooden panels affixed to a movable coat rack, and audio cables with contact microphones and connectors were pulled through openings in the panels. In the performance Reorienting Orientationalism, New Direction (Haircolour), international class, Bohl effectively turned his canvasses into amplifiers for Tcherepnin’s music by mounting so-called transducers, or energy converters, onto them so that they transmitted the vibrations produced by the sounds. Tcherepnin’s music will also be featured in the installation at the Kunstverein Hamburg exhibition.

The exhibition’s name Cornet of Horse is inspired by the title of a book by George Alfred Henty (1832-1902) on Marlborough’s wars, which Bohl came across when he was looking for an ambiguous translation for the German word Eiswaffel — or “ice cream cornet”.

Henning Bohl, Cornet of Horse, 2011, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Chaosium Inc., 2011 (rechts), Klappbürotische, Installationsansicht / installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Foto / photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

Henning Bohl, Cornet of Horse, 2011, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.

 

Henning Bohl, Corner of a Cornfield, 2010, Papier auf grundierter Leinwand, Rigipsplatten, Klapptischböcke, Trockenbauprofile, Installation view Kunstverein Hamburg, Photo: Fred Dott / Kunstverein Hamburg, Courtesy Johann König, Berlin; Karin Günther, Hamburg; Casey Kaplan, New York.