Otto Steinert (1915-1978), Ein-Fuß-Gänger, 1950, Gelatin silver print, 28,5 x 39 cm (P9504204), Courtesy Galerie Kicken Berlin, © Nachlass Otto Steinert, Museum Folkwang, Essen.

Wolfgang Tillmans (*1968), paper drop (window), 2006, C-type print in artists frame, 145 x 200 cm, Property of Städescher Museums-Verein e.V., © Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Köln / Berlin, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main, Acquired in 2008 with funds from the Städelkomitee 21. Jahrhundert.

Contemporary Photography and its Debt to the Practice of Painting

Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008), 10-80-C-17 (NYC), aus der Serie: In + Out of City Limits: New York / Boston, Gelatin silver print on fibre-based paper, 58 x 73 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung at the Städel Museum, © Estate of Robert Rauschenberg / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2012.

Otto Steinert (1915-1978), Luminogramm, 1952, Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1952, 41,5 x 60 cm, Courtesy Galerie Kicken Berlin, © Nachlass Otto Steinert, Museum Folkwang, Essen.

Thomas Ruff (*1958), Substrat 10 l, 2002, C-type print, 186 x 238 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2012.

Hiroshi Sugimoto (*1948), Sam Eric, Pennsylvania, 1978, Gelatin silver print, 42,5 x 54,5 cm, Private collection, Frankfurt, © Hiroshi Sugimoto / Courtesy The Pace Gallery.

Hiroshi Sugimoto (*1948), Ionian Sea, Santa Cesarea, Italy, 1990, Gelatin silver print, 50.8 x 61.2 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung at the Städel Museum, Frankfurt, © Hiroshi Sugimoto / Courtesy The Pace Gallery.

Sherrie Levine (*1947), After Edgar Degas (Detail), 1987, 5 lithographies on hand-made paper, 69 x 56 cm
DZ BANK Kunstsammlung im Städel Museum, Frankfurt, © Sherrie Levine / Courtesy Jablonka Galerie, Köln.

Louise Lawler (*1947), It Could Be Elvis, 1994, Cibachrome, varnished with shellac, , 74,5 x 91 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung at the Städel Museum, © Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.

Luigi Ghirri (1943-1992), Atelier Morandi, Grizzana, 1989/90, C-type print, 43 x 50,5 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung, © Eredi di Luigi Ghirri / Courtesy Sammlung DZ BANK und siebenhaar art projects, Königstein//Ts.

Oliver Boberg (*1965), Unterführung, 1997, C-type print, 75 x 84 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung, © Oliver Boberg / Courtesy L.A. Galerie – Lothar Albrecht, Frankfurt.

 

Städel Museum
Städelsches Kunstinstitut
und Städtische Galerie
Dürerstraße 2
+ 49(0)69-605098-170
Frankfurt am Main
Exhibition Hall of the Department of Prints
and Drawings and Metzler Foyer
Painting in Photography.
Strategies of Appropriation

June 27-September 23, 2012

The comprehensive presentation Painting in Photography. Strategies of Appropriation highlights the influence of painting on the imagery produced by contemporary photographic art. Based on the museum’s own collection and including important loans from the DZ Bank Kunstsammlung as well as international private collections and galleries, the exhibition at the Städel centers on about 60 examples, among them major works by László Moholy-Nagy, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Wolfgang Tillmans, Thomas Ruff, Jeff Wall, and Amelie von Wulffen. Whereas the influence of the medium of photography on the “classic genres of art” has already been the subject of analysis in numerous exhibitions and publications, less attention has been paid to the impact of painting on contemporary photography to date. The show at the Städel explores the reflection of painting in the photographic image by pursuing various artistic strategies of appropriation which have one thing in common: they reject the general expectation held about photography that it will document reality in an authentic way.

Since 220 works of contemporary photography of the DZ BANK Kunstsammlung have been handed over to the Städel Museum in 2008, the medium of photography features as an important new part of the latter’s collection. About 20of the works transferred into the possession of the Städel Museum are presented next to another 20 loans from the DZ BANK Kunstsammlung in the show — an arrangement continuing the two institutions’ productive collaboration.

The key significance of photography within contemporary art and its incorporation into the collection of the Städel Museum offer an occasion to fathom the relationship between painting and photography in an exhibition. While painting dealt with the use of photography in the mass media in the 1960s, today’s photographic art shows itself seriously concerned with the conditions of painting. Again and again, photography reflects, thematizes, or represents the traditional pictorial medium, maintaining an ambivalent relationship between appropriation and detachment.

Numerous works presented in the Städel’s exhibition return to the painterly abstractions of the prewar and postwar avant-gardes, translate them into the medium of photography, and thus avoid a reproduction of reality. Early examples for the adaption of techniques of painting in photography are László Moholy-Nagy’s (1895-1946) photograms dating from the 1920s. For his photographs shot without a camera, the Hungarian artist and Bauhaus teacher arranged objects on a sensitized paper; these objects left concrete marks as supposedly abstract forms under the influence of direct sunlight. In Otto Steinert’s (1915-1978) nonrepresentational light drawings or “luminigrams,” the photographer’s movement inscribed itself directly into the sensitized film. The pictures correlate with the gestural painting of Jackson Pollock’s Abstract Expressionism. A product of random operations during the exposure and development of the photographic paper, Wolfgang Tillmans’ (*1968) work Freischwimmer 54 (2004) is equally far from representing the external world. It is the pictures’ fictitious depth, transparency, and dynamics that lend Thomas Ruff’s photographic series Substrat its extraordinary painterly quality recalling color field paintings or Informel works. For his series Seascapes the Japanese artist Hiroshi Sugimoto (*1948) seems to have “emptied” the motif through a long exposure time: the sublime pictures of the surface of the sea and the sky — which either blur or are set off against each other — seem to transcend time and space.

In addition to the photographs mentioned, the exhibition Painting in Photography includes works by artists who directly draw on the history of painting in their choice of motifs. The mise-en-scène piece Picture for Women (1979) by the Canadian photo artist Jeff Wall (born in 1946), which relates to Édouard Manet’s famous painting Un Bar aux Folies-Bergère from 1882, may be cited as an example for this approach. The camera positioned in the center of the picture reveals the mirrored scene and turns into the eye of the beholder. The fictitious landscape pictures by Beate Gütschow (born in 1970), which consist of digitally assembled fragments, recall ideal Arcadian sceneries of the 17th and 18th centuries. The photographs taken by Italian Luigi Ghirri (1943-1992) in the studio of Giorgio Morandi (1890-1964) “copy” Morandi’s still lifes by representing the real objects in the painter’s studio instead of his paintings.

Another appropriative strategy sees the artist actually becoming active as a painter, transforming either the object he has photographed or its photographic representation. Oliver Boberg’s, Richard Hamilton’s, Georges Rousse’s and Amelie von Wulffen’s works rank in this category. For her series Stadtcollagen (1998-1999) Amelie von Wulffen (born in 1966) assembled drawing, photography, and painting to arrive at the montage of a new reality. The artist’s recollections merge with imaginary spaces offering the viewer’s fantasy an opportunity for his or her own associations.

The exhibition also encompasses positions of photography for which painting is the object represented in the picture. The most prominent examples in this section come from Sherrie Levine (born in 1947) und Louise Lawler (born in 1947), both representatives of US Appropriation Art. From the late 1970s on, Levine and Lawler have photographically appropriated originals from art history. Levine uses reproductions of paintings from a catalogue published in the 1920s: she photographs them and makes lithographs of her pictures. Lawler photographs works of art in private rooms, museums, and galleries and thus rather elucidates the works’ art-world context than the works as such.

The exhibition was developed in cooperation with Frankfurt’s Goethe-Universität on the occasion of a seminar offered by Dr. Henning Engelke, Dr. Martin Engler, and Carolin Köchling at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in the winter semester 2011/2012. The accompanying catalogue will feature text contributions by the seminar participants. The publication has been made possible through the support of the DZ BANK and the Georg und Franziska Speyer’sche Hochschulstiftung.

Louise Lawler (*1947), Add To It (E), 2003, Digital fujiflex mounted on aluminum box, 27,9 x 27,9 cm. DZ BANK Kunstsammlung, © Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.

Richard Hamilton (1922–2011), Eight-Self-Portraits (Detail), 1994, Thermal dye sublimation prints, 40 x 35 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2012.

Amelie von Wulffen (*1966), Ohne Titel ("Stadtcollagen, III"), 1998, Oil paint, photos on paper, 111,5 x 95 cm, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main, © Amelie von Wulffen, Acquired in 2008 with funds from the Städelcomitee 21. Jahrhundert,
Property of Städelscher Museums-Verein e.V.

Wolfgang Tillmans (*1968), Freischwimmer 54, 2004, C-type in artists frame, 237 x 181 x 6 cm, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main, © Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Köln / Berlin, Acquired in 2008 with funds from the Städelkomitee 21. Jahrhundert, Property of Städelscher Museums-Verein e.V.

Sherrie Levine (*1947), After Edgar Degas (Detail), 1987, 5 lithographies on hand-made paper, 69 x 56 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung im Städel Museum, Frankfurt, © Sherrie Levine / Courtesy Jablonka Galerie, Köln.

William Eggelston (*1939), UNTITLED (SUMNER, MISSISSIPPI, CASSIDY BAYOU IN BACKGROUND), 1975, Dye-transfer print, 50, 8 x 61 cm, DZ BANK Kunstsammlung, © Eggleston Artistic Trust. Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.

 

Jeff Wall (*1946), Picture for Women, 1979, Transparency in lightbox, 14,5 x 204,5 cm, Courtesy of the artist, © Courtesy of the artis.

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946), Photogram, ca.1923-25, Unique photogram, toned printing-out paper, 12,6 x 17,6 cm (P1007015), Courtesy Galerie Kicken Berlin, © Hattula Moholy-Nagy / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.