Dana Hakim, Necklace, 2011. Iron, mirrored foil, thread, colour, lacquer, Photo: Josef Bercovich.

Sara Borgegård, Necklace, 2011. Iron, colour, carpet thread, Photo: Sara Borgegård.

Sara Borgegård, Necklace, 2011, Iron, colour, silk thread, Photo: Sara Borgegård.

New Danish Jewelry Art from an Academy on the Edge

Tiina Rajakallio, Necklace Unho, 2011, wood, steel, Photo: Tiina Rajakallio.

Tiina Rajakallio, Necklace Unho, 2011, wood, thread, sealing wax, Photo: Tiina Rajakallio.

Agnes Larsson, Necklace, 2011, Carbon, horse hair, iron, Photo: Miki Anagrius.

Nicolas Cheng, Brooch, 2010. Silver, leather, amber, sea cucumber, Photo: Nicolas Cheng.

Hanna Hedman, Necklace Human Tree, 2010. Silver, copper, colour, Photo: Sanna Lindberg.

 

Pinakothek der Moderne
Barer Strasse 40
+ 089/23805-360
Münich
Adellab – The State of Things.
Konstfack Stockholm. Schmuck

March 17-April 29, 2012

The starting point is the human body which is construed as the link between the person’s outer and inner worlds — this concept defines the design approach taken at Ädellab, the Department of Jewelry at the Konstfack Stockholm, University College of Arts, Crafts and Design. On the basis of the existing Department of Metals, Ädellab was founded in 2004 by Dutch jewelry artist Ruudt Peters and has since 2006 been emphatically influenced by Danish jewelry artist Karen Pontoppidan, who is head of Ädellab by now. The department’s methodology cuts across both geographical borders and artistic ideas. Ädellab has made a name for itself with a decidedly contemporary approach that explores the possibilities afforded by the medium of jewelry as an important and independent form of expression today. A person’s own ideas, observations, fascinations and obsessions can just as much be lent form as can emotions, issues of identity or interpersonal debate.

Karen Pontoppidan comments: 'The final-year projects undertaken by exam students are not a matter of fulfilling an educational task, but demonstrate the individual need for expression that spawns creation. The artistic expression and therefore the work of the graduates cannot therefore be understood only in terms of intrinsic logic or the wish to understand the existence of the state of things. The work was created because an artist, a human being with experiences, feelings, dreams and failures, wanted the pieces to be.'

The exhibition is being held on the occasion of the Schmuck (Jewelry) show at the Internationale Handwerksmesse. Under the direction of Professor Karen Pontoppidan Ädellab is presenting a selection of final-year projects from the last five years at Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich.

Yasar Aydin, Brooch 2, 2011, Steel, leather, glass, Photo: Yasar Aydin.

Agnes Larsson, Necklace, 2011, Carbon, horse hair, iron, Photo: Carl Bengtsson.

Daniela Hedman, Necklace Feet, 2010. Copper, cotton, thread, Photo: Daniela Hedman.

Daniela Hedman, Necklace Head, 2008: Wax, copper, latex, Photo: Daniela Hedman.

Daniela Hedman, Brooch Hand, 2010. Wax, copper, skin, needles, thread, silver, Photo: Johan Söderling.

Nicolas Cheng, Brooch, 2010. Silver, amber, silk, sea sponge, Photo: Nicolas Cheng.

Beatrice Brovia, Necklace Ex Voto (On Initiation), 2009, Wax, textile, Photo: Beatrice Brovia.

Beatrice Brovia, Necklace Ex Voto (On Initiation), 2009, Wax, textile, Photo: Beatrice Brovia.

Katrin Spranger, Necklace Best Before, 2011, Crude oil and its products, gold, silver. Fashion: Thomas Stoess, Photo: Gerrit Meier.

Katrin Spranger, Necklace Best Before, 2011, Crude oil and its products, gold, silver. Fashion: Thomas Stoess, Photo: Gerrit Meier.