Hashio Kiyoshi (aka Kajimoto Seizaburo) Japanese, 1888-1963. Morning Sea, 1915. Silk and lacquered wood. 191.8 x 304.8 x 3.8 cm. Allentown Art Museum, Pennsylvania, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Van Santvoord, 2008, 2008.007.000.

Jutta Sika, designer, Austrian, 1877-1964. Wiener Porzellan-Manufaktur, Josef Böck, manufacturer, Austria (Vienna), 1828-1960. Tea Service, ca. 1902-1903. Porcelain. Teapot, 17.2 x 17.8 x 12.7 cm. Lent by The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, The Modernism Collection, gift of Norwest Bank Minnesota.

Marianne Rath, Austrian, 1904-1985. J. & L. Lobmeyr, Austria (Vienna), 1823-present. Karlsbader Kristallglasfabriken A.G., Czech Republic (Karlovy Vary), under name, 1922-1941. Centerpiece and Bowls, ca. 1925. Glass. Centerpiece: 11.4 x 36.8 x 29.9 cm, Bowls: 9.8 x 12.1 x 7.6 cm, Stand: 4.5 x 41.9 x 31.1 cm. J. & L. Lobmeyr, Vienna.

Shifting Shape of Modern Decorative Art, World Fairs, 1851-1939

Raymond Ruys, Belgian, 1885-1956. Delheid Freres, Belgium (Brussels), 1828-1981. Zaire Centerpiece bowl, 1930. Silver. 13.3 x 27.3 cm. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Purchase: the Charlotte and Perry
Faeth Fund, 2002.4.

Namikawa Sosuke, Japanese, 1847-1910. Bowl, ca. 1900. Enamel and silver. 11.8 x 20.8 cm. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Acquired by Henry Walters, 1900, 44.546.

József Rippi-Rónai, designer, Hungarian, 1861-1927. Zsolnay Factory, manufacturer, Hungary (Pécs), 1853-present. Plates, designed 1897-1898; manufactured ca. 1906. Porcelain with enamel. 3 x 24 cm. Janus Pannonius Museum, Pécs.

Gilbert Rohde, American, 1894-1944. Herman Miller Clock Company, United States (Zeeland, MI), 1927-1937. Z-Clock, 1933. Glass, enamel and chromium-plated steel. 29.9 x 30.5 x 7.6 cm. Dallas Museum of Art, anonymous gift, 2006.

J. & L. Lobmeyr, manufacturer, Austria (Vienna), 1822-present. Plate and Punch Bowl, ca. 1878. Glass with mica, enameling and gilding. Overall H.: 14 x Diam.: 35.5 x 40 cm. J. & L. Lobmeyr, Vienna.

G. Paulding Farnham, designer, American, 1859-1927. Tiffany & Co., manufacturer, United States (New
York, NY), 1837-present. Viking Punch Bowl, ca. 1893. Iron with silver, gold and wood. 42.4 x 51.4 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, The Edgar J. Kaufmann Foundation Gift, 1969, 69.4.

René Jules Lalique, French (Paris), 1860-1945. Brooch, ca. 1903. Gold, glass, enamel and sapphire. 8.1 x 13.3 cm. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Acquired by Henry Walters, 1904, 57.943.

Jules Pierre Michel Diéterle, designer of form, French, 1811-1889. Antoine-Léon Brunel-Rocque, painter of figural scenes, French, 1822-ca. 1883. Pierre Doré, decorator, French, act. 1867. Léopolde Burthe, designer of decorative panels, French (b. New Orleans), 1823-1860. Sévres Porcelain Manufactory, France (Sévres), 1756-present. Coupe de Rivoli (Footed Bowl), 1863-1867. Hard-paste porcelain with enamel, gilding, and copper alloy with mercury gilding. 38.1 x 46.7 cm. Purchase: the Helen Jane and R. Hugh “Pat” Uhlmann Fund, 2003.18.

Jean-Valentin Morel, French, 1794-1860. Cup, 1854-1855. Bloodstone (jasper), gold, enamels, emeralds,
rubies, sapphires and cameos. 27.9 x 25.4 x 17.8 cm. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Dennis T. Hollings Memorial Fund and the Robertine Daniels Art Fund in memory of her late husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr., and her late son, Michael Fairbanks, 2004.27.

Miyagawa Kozan, Japanese, 1842-1916. Vase, ca. 1904. Glazed porcelain. 35.6 x 31.2 cm. The Walters Art
Museum, Baltimore, Acquired by Henry Walters, 1904, 49.1912 Walters.

Ernest Bussiére, French (Nancy), 1863-1937. Daum Freres, manufacturer, France (Nancy), est. 1885. Pitcher, ca. 1900. Glass. 20.5 x 8.5 cm. Designmuseum Danmark.

Rozenburg Haagsche Plateelbakkerij, The Netherlands (The Hague), 1883-1914. Milk Jug, 1900. Glazed porcelain with enamel. 108 x 40.6 x 33.7 cm. Designmuseum, Danmark, Copenhagen, 793.

Gorham Manufacturing Company, United States (Providence, RI), 1831-present. Wine Pitcher, 1893. Glass and silver with gilding. 30.5 x 22.9 x 17.8 cm. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Purchase: the Charlotte and Perry Faeth Fund, 2006.19.

Georges Fouquet, French, 1862-1957. Corsage Ornament, ca. 1923. Jade, onyx, diamonds, enamel and platinum. 22.5 x 9.5 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Eva and Michael Chow, 2001, 2001.723.

Cristalleries de Baccarat, France, 1764-present. Punch Bowl with Goblets, Tray, and Ladle, ca. 1867. Glass. Overall: 58.4 x 69.6 cm). The Corning Museum of Glass. Gift of Mrs. Charles K. Davis, (67.3.41).

Elkington & Co., England (Birmingham), 1829-1963. Pair of Vases, ca. 1875. Enameled and gilded brass. Each H.: 17.1 x Diam. 10.8 cm. Purchase: the Lillian M. Dively Fund, 2006.36.1-2.

Elkington & Co., England (Birmingham), 1829-1963. Pair of Vases, ca. 1875. Enameled and gilded brass. Each H.: 17.1 x Diam. 10.8 cm. Purchase: the Lillian M. Dively Fund, 2006.36.1-2.

Gustave Herter, American (born Germany), 1830-1898. Ernst Plassmann, woodworker, American, 1823-1877. Bulkley and Herter, manufacturer, United States (New York, NY), ca. 1852-1858. Bookcase, 1852-53. White oak, eastern white.

Attributed to Louis Dierra, American, active ca. 1939. Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., United States (Pittsburgh, PA), 1883-present. Chair, ca. 1939. Glass with synthetic upholstery. 74.3 x 59 x 57.8 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, DuPuy Fund, 83.78.2.

 

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
816-751-1278
Kansas City
Inventing the Modern World:
Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851-1939

April 14-August 19, 2012

Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851-1939, a groundbreaking exhibition of extraordinary objects representing the pinnacle of science and artistic ingenuity, features many objects seen in the United States for the first time.

The exhibition was co-organized by Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City and Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Inventing the Modern World includes about 200 objects shown at every major and several minor world’s fairs from 1851 to 1939, carefully chosen through a generous research grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The exhibition is co-curated by Catherine L. Futter, the Helen Jane and Hugh “Pat” Uhlmann Curator of Decorative Arts at the Nelson-Atkins, and Jason T. Busch, Curatorial Chair for Collections and the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design at Carnegie.

“We associate world’s fairs with fun, and also signature architecture like the Eiffel Tower and the Crystal Palace,” said Julián Zugazagoitia, Director & CEO of the Nelson-Atkins. “But the importance of world’s fairs was reflected in the objects that continue to inspire elegance and creativity. Now, for the first time ever, those objects have been brought together for this major exhibition.”

World’s fairs were the most important vehicle for debuting technological and stylistic advancements on an international stage. They functioned as showcases and marketplaces for design on a global, national and individual level. Above all, they democratized design unlike any previous or concurrent forum.

Lynn Zelevansky, The Henry J. Heinz II Director of Carnegie Museum of Art said, “The historical context of •Inventing the Modern World• embodies a vision that will be inspirational for museum audiences across the country, and brings into play the capacity for inventive design in art, science and technology to improve the human condition and modern living.”

Due to the impermanence of the fairs, decorative arts from them are sometimes the only surviving elements. Decorative arts, particularly objects crafted in ceramic, metal, glass and wood, were the physical manifestation of the progressive ideals embodied in the fairs.

“We looked at literally thousands of decorative arts from around the globe,” said Futter. “We kept refining our choices to find the objects that really spoke about innovation. We are excited to bring them together for the first and only time to convey the sense of discovery and energy that these magnificent works at the fairs created.”

In order to compile the comprehensive list of breathtaking objects in the exhibition, Futter and Busch extensively investigated holdings displayed at world’s fairs throughout European and American public and private collections.

“The exhibition checklist comprises decorative arts unattainable as a group in any one museum in the world,” said Busch. “Objects were selected according to themes that resonate throughout •Inventing the Modern World•, including technique, cross-cultural influence and nationalistic inspiration, all of which shaped the competition inherent to the fairs.”

The exhibition was co-organized by Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City and Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh.

Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851-1939 travels to Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, from Oct. 13, 2012–Feb. 24, 2013.

A full-color catalogue, written by international scholars of the 19th and 20th century decorative arts and co-published by Skira Rizzoli, accompanies the exhibition.

Thomas E. Warren, designer, American, act. 1849-1852. American Chair Company, manufacturer, United States (Troy, NY), 1829-1858. Centripetal Spring Chair, ca. 1850. Painted and gilded iron, steel, and wood with replacement upholstery. 80 x 60.3 x 57.5 cm. Saint Louis Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Adelaide Cherbonnier, 147:1965.

Pierre Adrien Dalpayrat, French, 1844-1910. Vase, La Mer, 1898-1900. Glazed stoneware. 40.6 x 36.8 x 40.6 cm. Saint Louis Museum of Art, Richard Brumbaugh Trust in memory of Richard Irving Brumbaugh and Grace Lischer Brumbaugh and funds given by Jason Jacques, 7:2010.

William C. Codman, American (b. England), 1839-1921. Gorham Manufacturing Company, United
States (Providence, RI), 1831-present. Dressing Table and Stool, 1899. Silver with mirrored glass, ivory and replacement upholstery. Overall: 60 x
50 x 33 in. (152.4 x 137.1 x 87.8 cm). Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of Dr. Charles L. Venable, 2000.356.

Tiffany & Co., United States (New York, NY), 1837-present. Coffeepot, 1893. Silver with enamel, ivory, and jade. 25.4 x 15.6 x 7.6 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Decorative Arts Purchase Fund, 83.16.2.

Michel Dubost, designer, French, 1879-1952. Maison Ducharne, manufacturer, France (Paris), act. 1920-ca. 1927. L'oiseau dans la lumiére (The Bird in the Light), ca. 1925. Silk and metallic thread. 169.5 x 124.8 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Monsieur et Madame Jean Ducharne, 2004.84.

Charles Duron, French, 1814-1872. Coupe, ca. 1867. Agate with gilded and enameled brass. 12.7 x 18.4 x 12.1 cm). Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Women’s Committee Acquisition Fund, Gift of
Baroness Cassel Van Doorn, by exchange, and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund, 2008.76.

Gilbert Rohde, American, 1884-1944. Vanity and Ottoman, 1934. Painted white holly, red English elm, yellow poplar, mirrored glass, Bakelite and wool upholstery. Vanity: 168.3 x 130.2 x 40 cm; Ottoman: 49.5 x 44.5 cm. Yale University Art Gallery, 1999.125.1.1-2.

Carlo Bugatti, Italian, 1856-1940. Cobra Chair, 1902. Parchment-covered wood with paint, pencil and copper. 97.8 x 53.3 x 37.1 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Berdan Memorial Trust Fund, Helen Johnston Acquisition Fund, and Decorative Arts Purchase Fund, 95.16.

India (Brahmapur). Chair and Stool, ca. 1855. Ebony with ivory and replacement upholstery. Chair: 112 x 60 x 51.5 cm. Victoria & Albert, London. V&A Reproduction.

Keller Freres, France, 1881-1922. Pitcher, 1900. Gilded silver. 26.1 x 18 x 12.5 cm. Musée des Arts Décoratifs, 997.119.1.

Arabia Porcelain Factory, Finland (Helsinki), 1874-present. Vase, ca. 1902. Glazed earthenware. 35 x 15.9 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Purchase: Gift of Dr. David Werner and Sue Werner, 2011.2.

Eugene Feuillatre, French, 1879-1916. Peacock Flask, ca. 1900. Enameled copper. H.: 20 cm. Private Collection, Courtesy of Sinai and Sons
Ltd. London.

Johann Lötz Witwe Glassworks, Austria (Klostermühle), 1836-1947. Vase, ca. 1887-89. Glass with gilding. H.: 64.8 cm. Toledo Museum of Art, Purchased with funds from the Libbey Endowment, Gift of Edward Drummond Libbey, 2006.173A-C.

Henry Hugh Armstead, English, 1828-1905. C. F. Hancock & Sons, England (London), 1849-present.
Tennyson Vase, 1867. Silver and gilded silver with replacement textile. 108 x 40.6 x 33.7 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund
and Berdan Memorial Trust Fund, 2007.57.

Alexis Falize, French, 1811-1898. Antoine Tard, French, active ca. 1860-ca. 1889. Maison Falize, France, 1838-1897. Locket, ca. 1867. Enamel and
gold. 5.4 x 3.1 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Andrew R. and Martha Holden Jennings Fund,
1979.11.

Gio Ponti, designer, Italian, 1891-1979. Manufattura di Doccia, Richard-Ginori, manufacturer, Italian (Milan). La Passeggiata Archaeologica (The
Archaeological Stroll)
urn with cover, 1925. Porcelain. H.: 0.2 cm. Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Edward C. Moore Jr.
Gift, 1931 (31.83ab) 31.83a,b.

Oswald Haerdtl, designer, Austrian, 1899-1959. J. & L. Lobmeyr, manufacturer, Austria (Vienna), 1822-present. Ambassador Service Wine Decanter, 1925. Muslin glass. 39.4 x 13.7 cm. J. & L. Lobmeyr, Vienna.

Algot Erikson, decorator, Swedish, 1868-1937. Rörstrand Porslins Fabriker, manufacturer, Sweden
(Stockholm), 1726-1964. Vase, 1904. Porcelain. 42.3 x 18.4 cm. Cincinnati Art Museum, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Mr. and Mrs. William O. DeWitt, Jr.

Otto Eckmann, designer, German, 1865-1902. Kunstwebschule Scherrebek, manufacturer, Germany, 1896-1905. Five Swans, 1897. Wool
and cotton. 265 x 76.5 cm. Lent by The Wolfson ian-
Florida International University, Miami Beach, Florida, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection.

Charles Duron, French, 1814-1872. Coupe, ca. 1867. Agate with gilded and enameled brass. 12.7 x 18.4 x 12.1 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Women’s
Committee Acquisition Fund, Gift of Baroness Cassel Van Doorn, by exchange, and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund, 2008.76.

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, United States (Corona, NY), 1892-1902. Bowl, ca. 1893. Glass. 13 x 29.2 cm. Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Purchase: Gift of Audrey Hillman Fisher Foundation, 2007.41.

Thomas John Bott, Sr., designer of form, English, 1829-1870. Thomas John Bott, Jr., decorator, English, 1854-1932. Worcester Royal Porcelain Company, Ltd., manufacturer, England (Worcester), 1751-present. Ewer showing a Scene from the Triumph of Scipio and Stand, ca. 1871. Glazed and enameled porcelain with gilding. Ewer: 28.6 x 13.5 cm, Stand Diam.: 30.5 cm. Philadelphia Museum of Art.